health

Transactional Sex as a Response to Risk in Western Kenya

Though formal and informal sex work has long been identified as crucial for the spread of HIV/AIDS, the nature of the sex-for-money market remains poorly understood. Using a unique panel dataset constructed from 192 self-reported diaries, we find that women who engage in transactional sex substantially increase their supply of risky, better compensated sex to cope with unexpected health shocks, particularly the illness of another household member.

No Excuses: A Living Experience of the Struggle for Rights

PLRI partner Meena Seshu gave the prestigious Jonathan Mann Memorial Lecture at the 2010 International AIDS Conference.

Meena reflects on the approach that her organisation SANGRAM has used to support the work of VAMP the collective of women in sex work.

She introduces SANGRAM’s Bill of Rights which sets out guidelines for programming interventions around HIV and AIDS:

Only Rights can Stop the Wrongs: The Smart Person's Guide to HIV and Sex Work

Unfavourable laws, stigma, violence, and discrimination cause sex workers’ vulnerability to ill health, social exclusion and human rights violations. Sex workers face these to varying degrees in all cultures from Switzerland to Swaziland, Canada to Cambodia.

This guide, published by the International Network of Sex Work Projects, outlines their understanding of HIV and sex work and sets out their global agenda for change.

News interview with sex workers in Uganda

This news interview features members of the Network of Sex Work Projects. They describe the challenges that they face in Uganda and the way that they are subject to stigma and discrimination and excluded from development policy and plans.

Report of the Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health

This report considers the denial of sex workers’ enjoyment of the right to health that results from the criminalization of sex work and related practices (such as solicitation). Impacts on the right to health are discussed along with issues particular to sex work. Specifically, the failure of legal recognition of the sex-work sector results in infringements of the right to health, through the failure to provide safe working conditions, and a lack of recourse to legal remedies for occupational health issues.

Sex workers in India combat stigma to demand rights and health care

Sampada Grameen Mahila Sanstha (SANGRAM) is an HIV/AIDS organization that works primarily with sex workers. SANGRAM is based in the Sangli district in Maharashtra state. 

Analysis of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Related Activities in Round 8 and 9 Proposals

This document from the Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and Malaria (the Fund), authored by Adam Graham, analyses HIV proposals to the Fund in Rounds 8 and 9.

It focuses on men who have sex with men, sex workers and transgendered people and looks at levels of participation and representation, the evidence base and service delivery.

UNAIDS Outlook Report

The Outlook Report explores new ideas and ways to use the data collected in the AIDS Epidemic Update companion report. It provides a great deal of information about sex work and HIV.

Sex Workers should not be criminalized

This newsletter from Community Socio Economic Development Initiatives (CSDI) covers the proceedings of a meeting held on the 22nd and 23rd of February 2010. The meeting brought together Rwandan civil society organisations working on HIV & AIDS, health promotion and human rights and was lead by the Rwanda NGO Forum on AIDS Health Promotion and Fact Rwanda. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the provision in the draft penal code that would criminalize sex work. This legal provision, article 225, would sentence sex workers to 3 years in jail and a fine of 50.000 to 500.000 RWF.

Sex work and the 2010 FIFA World Cup: time for public health imperatives to prevail

An article in Globalization and Health by Richter M L, Chersich M F, Scorgie F, Luchters S, Temmerman M and Steen R. The authors address the issue of commercial sex in relation to the upcoming football World Cup which will be hosted by South Africa. They argue that laws that criminalise sex work not only compound sex workers’ individual risk for HIV, but also compromise broader public health goals. They suggest that a moratorium on the enforcement of laws that persecute and victimise sex workers during the World Cup period.

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