Paulo Longo Research Initiative

PLRI aims to consolidate ethical, interdisciplinary scholarship on sex work to inform activism and advocacy that will improve the human rights, health and well being of sex workers.

More about PLRI

SANGRAM on USAID Website

After all the drama of the US government accusing PLRI and NSWP partner SANGRAM of being traffickers because they returned US money rather than sign its anti prostitution pledge, SANGRAM triumphs! A SANGRAM case study has been posted on USAID's AIDSTAR-One website. 

Launch of Luttes XXX: inspirations du mouvement des travailleuses du sexe

A new anthology by Les éditions du Remue-ménage (http://www.editions-rm.ca/) on the sex workers rights movment will be launched in Montreal on November 10th 2011. Co-editied by Maria Nengeh Mensah, Claire Thiboutot and Louise Toupin, this book reproduces and presents the various forms of resistance that have inspired sex workers around the world to mobilize and demand social recognition.

The movement to criminalise sex work in the United States

An article in the Journal of Law and Society, Volume 37, Number 1, March 2010.

Weitzer explores the growth of what he describes as a moral crusade in the US aimed at expanding the criminalisation of sex work. He shows how there is a growing trend to conflate sex work with human trafficking and explores the impact of this movement on legal norms and government policies. Weitzer believes this trend has been prompted by the expansion of the sex industry and its normalisation in American society.

Knowledge About Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Attitudes Toward Female Sex Workers With STI Symptoms Among Health Care Providers in Laos

This study assessed the knowledge and attitudes among health care providers  providing sexual health services to female sex workers  in the border region of Thailand and Vietnam. Attitudes to sex workers were found to be very poor.

The potential impact of an HIV vaccine with limited protection on HIV incidence in Thailand: A modeling study

The following is an abstract about the potential benefits of a HIV vaccine. It mentions 'risk compensation' which means abandoning condoms. It points out that mathmatical modelling shows that a partially effective vaccine may lead to increased HIV among sex workers if sex workers are less able to persuade clients to use condoms. The same is true of Prep and microbicides.

Sex Trafficking or Sex Work? Conceptions of Trafficking Among Anti-Trafficking Organizations in Nepal

Trafficking for sexual purposes is widely recognized as a violation of human rights. Trafficking of women and girls within Nepal and from Nepal to India’s red light districts is thought to be extremely common. There is sharp debate within the anti-trafficking community, both within Nepal and globally, about why trafficking occurs and how to prevent it.

Men and Development: Politicizing Masculinities

'Men and Development: Politicizing Masculinities'  includes a chapter entitled 'The Good, The Bad and The Ugly: Constructions of Masculinity and Contemporary Understandings of Sex Work' that looks at men as buyers and sellers of sex and desconstructs the myth of the 'pimp'.

Policies on sex trafficking are changing conceptions of Europe, citizenship and labour markets

Sex trafficking is widely seen as modern slavery. But, in her new book, Rutvica Andrijasevic shows that this labelling process is not as benevolent as it appears.

The Invisible Men: finding and engaging with the male partners of street sex workers

An article in press for the Journal of Men's Health.

Men, in general, remain less likely than women to seek medical care, and are only half as likely as women to undertake preventive health visits and/or screening tests. There is a great need to increase men’s health awareness and reduce this significant gender disparity.

An Exploratory Study of the Social Contexts, Practices and Risks of Men Who Sell Sex in Southern and Eastern Africa

The aim of the research presented in this report was to explore the social contexts, life experiences, vulnerabilities and sexual risks experienced by men who sell sex in Southern and Eastern Africa, with a focus on five countries; Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe. It sought to better understand differing and similar socio-cultural scenarios and personal life stories of male sex workers in these countries and to improve the representation of male sex workers in relevant regional organisations, particularly within the African Sex Workers Alliance (ASWA).

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