HIV

Condom use during commercial sex among clients of Hijra sex workers in Karachi, Pakistan

Article in BMJ Open 2011;1, that describes the prevalence and predictors of condom use and sexual risk in the male clients of transgender (Hijra) sex workers in Karachi, Pakistan. 

Design Cross-sectional study.

Setting Karachi, Pakistan.

Long term virological, immunological and mortality outcomes in a cohort of HIV-infected female sex workers treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy in Africa

Article in BMC Public Health 2011, 11:700.

Background

Concerns have been raised that marginalised populations may not achieve adequate compliance to antiretroviral therapy. Our objective was to describe the long-term virological, immunological and mortality outcomes of providing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with strong adherence support to HIV-infected female sex workers (FSWs) in Burkina Faso and contrast outcomes with those obtained in a cohort of regular HIV-infected women.

When Event Spaces and Commercialised Sex Spaces Overlap: Gendered discourses of sex work and the Olympic Games

In the past decade, debates regarding the sex industry, especially street-level sex work, have become exacerbated by the hosting of global sporting events. Such issues as displacement, safety concerns and financial cuts to social services have contributed to the problematisation of the overlap between mega event spaces and commercial sex spaces.

Factors associated with HIV among female sex workers in a high HIV prevalent state of India

The study was carried out to assess the factors associated with HIV seropositivity among female sex workers (FSWs) in Dimapur, Nagaland, a high HIV prevalence state of India. A total of 426 FSWs were recruited into the study using respondent driven sampling (RDS).

Data on demographic characteristics, sexual and injecting risk behaviours were collected from them and were tested for HIV, Syphilis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis

Advancing sexual health and human rights in the Western Pacific

Widespread criminalization of sex work has had the effect of undermining the sexual health of sex workers, for instance by preventing them from accessing health care services for fear of criminal prosecution if found to be a sex worker. Moreover, laws permitting mandatory HIV or STI testing of sex workers and mandating disclosure of private health information to employers sanction direct interference in the private lives of sex workers.

Extract from report
 

Working from a rights-based approach to health service delivery to sex workers

This article, in Exchange on HIV/AIDS, Sexuality and Gender, focuses on the relationship between HIV and sex workers’ rights. It outlines the elements of a rights-based approach to sex work and includes information on how the criminalisation of sex work and stigma and discrimination increase vulnerability. It suggests that the key elements of a rights based approach are that it:

IPPF HIV Update 2008

This short update from IPPF contains an article by Melissa Ditmore, the former coordinator of the International Network of Sex Work Projects. She outlines some key principles of HIV programming with sex workers. These include that interventions should be:

Experience of violence and adverse reproductive health outcomes, HIV risks among mobile female sex workers in India

Article in BMC Public Health 2011, 11:357.

Female sex workers are a population sub-group most affected by the HIV epidemic in India and elsewhere. Despite research and programmatic attention to FSWs, little is known regarding sex workers' reproductive health and HIV risk in relation to their experiences of violence. This paper in BMC Public Health therefore aims to understand the linkages between violence and the reproductive health and HIV risks among a group of mobile FSWs in India.

Methods

How likely are HIV-positive female sex workers in China to transmit HIV to others?

Female sex workers (FSW) are highly marginalised and HIV-positive FSW are under a double stigma. No study has assessed the likelihood of secondary transmission via HIV-positive FSW in China.

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