monograph

Fiji Cracks Down on Sex work

THE military regime in Fiji is taking on a new target: sex workers

A report published today by the University of NSW says sex workers, especially in Lautoka, the centre of Fiji’s sugar industry, north of Nadi, have been rounded up by the military and subjected to sleep deprivation, humiliation and forced physical labour.

Karen McMillan, a researcher with the International HIV Research Group at UNSW, said the sex workers were held in outdoor pens at an army base, woken every three hours and made to do duck-walks and squat in the mud.

The Ties that Bind; Migration and Trafficking of Women and Girls

This 2008 ILO report draws on surveys to paint a picture of the Cambodian sex industry that is at odds with accounts provided by sex workers. It conflates sexual exploitation with trafficking,  refers to sex workers as Commercial Sexually Exploited Women and Girls and  fails to distinguish between adults and children.

Claiming to reject the term 'sex work' as political the report is infact highly politicised using an  'abolitionist' conceptual framework.

 

 

 

 

Stop Harassing Us! Tackle Real Crime!, A Report on Human Rights Violations by Police Against Sex Workers in South Africa

The findings in this report highlight the gap between the rights enshrined in the South African Constitution and treatment meted out to sex workers. Even under the present, imperfect law, there is a stark contradiction between the actions of police and the due process laid out by the law for them to follow. Based on the complaints of 308 sex workers, the WLC found the following:

Banking Services for Sex Workers

There are a number of people who earn their living directly or indirectly through commercial sex work. Exploitation, vulnerability, forced labour; servitude, stigmatization characterizes Commercial Sex Workers (CSW). A sense of immorality, criminality, and informality associated with their work keeps them excluded from mainstream society.

Hit & Run The impact of anti trafficking policy and practice on Sex Worker’s Human Rights in Thailand

This powerful research is proof that with the right support sex workers can conduct their own research and policy advocacy on topics that reflect their priorities. Se also Empowers video, Last Rescue in Siam.

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Violence against sex workers is prevalent in Cambodia with customers and the police often the perpetrators

Passed to protect women, the 2008 law on human trafficking and sexual exploitation has been used by authorities to justify the harassment and abuse of sex workers.

But, Cambodian sex workers say it’s now time to demand their rights.Hundreds are gathered in the capital of Phnom Penh.They are clapping loudly as the host welcomes the first day of 16 days of activism against gender violence.They are wearing white shirts with the slogan: "United we can end violence against women and bring the peace."

Sex Work and Laws In South Asia

This monograph attempts to demystify and explain the content of the prevalent laws in the region which are relevant to activists and practitioners working in the field. Available legislation and case law have been analyzed from the point of view of the issues of conflation of trafficking and sex work, rights of sex workers to live in liberty and dignity, the right to move freely, the right to reside in a place of choice, the right to migrate, forced and voluntary sex work, entry of minors, rescue and rehabilitation.

Treatment as Prevention: How might the game change for sex workers?

“What drives continued expansion of the pandemic is not the absence of effective preventative technologies but discrimination, exploitation and repression of certain social groups,” Dr Peter Piot.

This article looks at the potential impact of partially effective, non contraceptive HIV prevention methods on sex workers in the light of recent news that anti-retroviral treatment (ART) by people with HIV substantially protects their HIV-uninfected sexual partners from acquiring HIV infection, with a 96 percent reduction in risk of HIV transmission.

Sex Workers Retirement Home in Mexico

A retirement home for elderly former and current prostitutes has been established in the Teptio neighborhood of Mexico. Casa Xochiquetzal, The House of the Beautiful Flowers, is located in one of the most dangerous parts of the city. It was named after the Goddess of Beauty and Sexual Love.

According to Rosalba Rio, director of the house, women must be at least 60-years-old to reside in Casa Xochiquetzal. It can accommodate up to 45 women. They currently care for 23 elderly former and current sex workers.

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